Friday, September 12, 2014

NEW: Frequency Update-International Shortwave Broadcast Guide: Summer 2014


This is the seventh update for the 2014 Summer edition of International Shortwave Broadcast Guide. The ebook from Teak Publishing, can be purchased at Amazon.com for U.S. $4.99, and is available at http://www.amazon.com/dp/Book6YKNFM

All time references are UTC, frequencies in kHz (kilohertz) // indicates a parallel frequency. Broadcast are daily unless otherwise indicated.

Country/Station
Language
Hrs/freq/info

Algeria, Radio TV Algerienne
0400-0459 on  7295 ISS 500 kW / 162 deg to CEAf Arabic Nat. Chaine 1
0500-0559 on  7295 ISS 500 kW / 194 deg to NWAf Arabic Nat. Chaine 1
0500-0505 on  9535 ISS 500 kW / 162 deg to CEAf French news bulletin
0505-0559 on  9535 ISS 500 kW / 162 deg to CEAf Arabic Holy Quran px
0600-0605 on 11985 ISS 500 kW / 194 deg to NWAf French news bulletin
0605-0659 on 11985 ISS 500 kW / 194 deg to NWAf Arabic Holy Quran px
1800-1900 on 13820 ISS 500 kW / 162 deg to CEAf Arabic Nat. Chaine 1
1900-2000 on 11765 ISS 500 kW / 194 deg to NWAf Arabic Nat. Chaine 1
1900-1905 on 13820 ISS 500 kW / 162 deg to CEAf French news bulletin
1905-1959 on 13820 ISS 500 kW / 162 deg to CEAf Arabic Holy Quran px
2000-2100 on  9375 ISS 500 kW / 162 deg to CEAf Arabic Nat. Chaine 1
2000-2005 on 11765 ISS 500 kW / 194 deg to NWAf French news bulletin
2005-2059 on 11765 ISS 500 kW / 194 deg to NWAf Arabic Holy Quran px
2100-2200 on  7495 ISS 500 kW / 194 deg to NWAf Arabic Nat. Chaine 1
2100-2105 on  9375 ISS 500 kW / 162 deg to CEAf French news bulletin
2105-2159 on  9375 ISS 500 kW / 162 deg to CEAf Arabic Holy Quran px
2200-2205 on  7495 ISS 500 kW / 194 deg to NWAf French news bulletin
2205-2259 on  7495 ISS 500 kW / 194 deg to NWAf Arabic Holy Quran px
The times in announcement are given in UTC+1 hour

Australia
Radio Australia adjust schedules affecting Tok Pisin and Burmese programs. The former 0900-1100 Tok Pisin program
is replaced with two slots; 0730-0800 and 1000-1030. Burmese programming has changed from daily programming to Monday
to Friday only.
(Top Nx 1176/06 Sept 2014)

Clandestine
At the end of October the Democratic Voice of Burma will stop transmissions on shortwave after 21 years of broadcasting.
Current schedule
2330-0030 on 11595 DB  100 kW / 125 deg to SEAs Burmese
1430-1530 on 11560 DB  100 kW / 125 deg to SEAs Burmese

Clandestine
Radio Free Sarawak - frequency change of Radio Free Sarawak in Iban Mon-Sat from Sep.2
1100-1230 NF 15430 TSH 100 kW / 250 deg to SEAs, ex 15425 June 23-August 30

Clandestine
 Frequency changes of Shiokaze Sea Breeze effective from Sep.1:
1330-1430 NF  6020 YAM 100 kW / 280 deg to KRE, ex 5985 Japanese Mon/Wed
1330-1430 NF  6020 YAM 100 kW / 280 deg to KRE, ex 5985 Chinese/Korean Tue
1330-1430 NF  6020 YAM 100 kW / 280 deg to KRE, ex 5985 English Thu
1330-1430 NF  6020 YAM 100 kW / 280 deg to KRE, ex 5985 Korean Fri
1330-1430 NF  6020 YAM 100 kW / 280 deg to KRE, ex 5985 Korean/Japanese Sat
1330-1430 NF  6020 YAM 100 kW / 280 deg to KRE, ex 5985 Japanese/Korean Sun
altternative: 5910/5985/6120/6135/6175

1600-1700 NF  6165 YAM 100 kW / 280 deg to KRE, ex 6090 Japanese Mon/Wed
1600-1700 NF  6165 YAM 100 kW / 280 deg to KRE, ex 6090 Chinese/Korean Tue
1600-1700 NF  6165 YAM 100 kW / 280 deg to KRE, ex 6090 English Thu
1600-1700 NF  6165 YAM 100 kW / 280 deg to KRE, ex 6090 Korean Fri
1600-1700 NF  6165 YAM 100 kW / 280 deg to KRE, ex 6090 Korean/Japanese Sat
1600-1700 NF  6165 YAM 100 kW / 280 deg to KRE, ex 6090 Japanese/Korean Sun
(DX Nx 870/09 Sept 2014)

Finland
3960.00, Radio Gramox, Hämeenkyrö (50 Watt), 0350-0410 and 1745-2205, Aug 25, 27 and 30, New station, Finnish talks and laughter, traditional and romantic Finnish songs, 1910 ID’s in English and German, best 35343, but only audible in LSB, because of DRM noise from 3965. (Petersen). Also heard at 2215-0005, Aug 23, old-style Finnish music and canned IDs. Very weak signal, SIO 142, but quite clear, parallel their web stream http://gramox.fi/. (Kenny)

Finnish R Rapu plans to start broadcasting in Russian.
Finnish commercial R Rapu submitted an application to the Ministry of Communications of Finland on access to radio frequencies intended for broadcasting to Russia, reports Helsingin Sanomat. R Rapu justifies his decision to go to the Russian-language broadcasting limited freedom of speech in Russia. According to preliminary estimates R Rapu, the launch of the Russian-language news portal will cost 500 thousand dollars. Money for the project was collected on raudfandingovom American site Kickstarter.com. Finnish scheduled news broadcast medium wave (MW) and possibly via the Internet. Transfer to MW can be heard at least in St. Petersburg. News of the website will be transmitted to the satellite. Satellite transmission could broadcast to the entire western Russia. Radio Rapu say their goal - to start broadcasting no later than early 2015. (fontanka.fi in OnAir.ru via RUS-DX No 782, Aug 24)
(DSWCI-DX Window 513 02 Sept 2014, via Anker Petersson)

France, R France International
Frequency changes of Radio France Internationale from Aug.31:
0600-0630 NF 11995 ISS 500 kW / 170 deg to WCAf Hausa, ex 15340 //
0600-0630 on 13750 ISS 500 kW / 170 deg to WCAf Hausa
1200-1300 NF 21690 ISS 500 kW / 185 deg to WCAf French, ex 17620 //
1200-1300 on 17620 ISS 500 kW / 200 deg to NWAf French
1200-1300 on 17660 MEY 250 kW / 342 deg to CeAf French
1200-1300 on 21580 ISS 500 kW / 155 deg to CeAf French
1500-1600 NF 15630 ISS 500 kW / 065 deg to SEAs Vietnamese, ex 17810.

Germany
Voice of Mongolia in English will be broadcast via Kall Krekel, Germany
1430-1500 on  7310 KLL 001 kW / non-dir to CeEu from September 1 till October 5
1730-1800 on  6005 KLL 100 kW / non-dir to CeEu from September 1 till October 5
1900-1930 on  3985 KLL 001 kW / non-dir to CeEu from September 1 till October 5

Iran
Frequency change of Voice of Islamic Republic of Iran IRIB from August 30
0023-0220 NF  9510 ZAH 500 kW / 289 deg to NEAf Arabic, ex 9420 to avoid ERTOpen

Upcoming frequency changes of Voice of Islamic Republic of Iran IRIB:
1753-1850 NF  7230 KAM 500 kW / 304 deg to EaEu Russian, ex 7350 // 5920
1923-2020 NF 11985 SIR 500 kW / 313 deg to WeEu English, ex 7315 //
9400,9715,11885

Russia, Voice of Russia
The radio situation in the world so far has been, that more and more international stations are closing down. In December last year the structures of the Voice of Russia and R Rossii were dissolved and very few broadcasts continued on SW on DRM under a new structure. Nearly all employees were dismissed and Russia began to dismantel its many SW transmitters. But surprisingly Russia just has reported to the HFCC (High Frequency Co-ordination Conference) that from October 01, 2014, the Voice of Russia again will be broadcasting in 14 languages on SW also in AM, and R Rossii will be reestablished. Due to the conflict with Ukraine with Russian troops supporting the Pro-Russians in Eastern Ukraine and Crimea, they obviously do not think their domestic information is heard in the West. Thus they decided to reactivate their Foreign Service in full scale.
(DSWCI-DX Window 513 02 Sept 2014, via Anker Petersson)

Voice of Russia to return to shortwave from October 1, 2014.

Registered frequencies in HFCC Database:

All times UTC

0000-0100 on 17770 P.K 250 kW / 247 deg to SEAs English
0000-0200 on  6120 ARM 500 kW / 110 deg to SoAs English
0000-0200 on 12060 ARM 500 kW / 290 deg to CeAm Spanish
0000-0300 on 11965 IRK 250 kW / 224 deg to SoAs English
0000-0400 on  6100 ARM 100 kW / 104 deg to N/ME English
0000-0500 on  6195 S.P 800 kW / 268 deg to SoAm Russian <<<<< 800 kW ???
0000-0600 on  7240 MSK 500 kW / 267 deg to SoAm Portuguese
0100-0300 on 17530 KHB 100 kW / 218 deg to EaAs Russian
0100-0300 on 17855 KHB 100 kW / 218 deg to EaAs Russian
0200-0400 on 11990 MSK 250 kW / 117 deg to CeAs Russian
0200-0600 on 11935 IRK 100 kW / 263 deg to CeAs Russian
0200-0600 on 12010 P.K 200 kW / 061 deg to NoAm English
0200-0600 on 12070 P.K 250 kW / 067 deg to NoAm English
0300-0500 on 17530 KHB 100 kW / 218 deg to EaAs English
0300-0600 on 11900 P.K 250 kW / 064 deg to NoAm English
0300-0600 on 17855 KHB 100 kW / 218 deg to EaAs English
0300-0700 on 11985 ARM 100 kW / 104 deg to CeAs Russian
0600-0900 on  7350 KHB 100 kW / 218 deg to EaAs English
0600-1000 on 15725 MSK 040 kW / 261 deg to WeEu English DRM
0600-1400 on  7280 IRK 100 kW / 044 deg to FERu Russian
0700-0900 on  9625 KLG 015 kW / 220 deg to WeEu German DRM
0700-1500 on 11975 ARM 100 kW / 104 deg to CeAs Russian
0800-1200 on  9870 MSK 200 kW / 190 deg to CeAs Russian
0900-1400 on  9625 KLG 015 kW / 220 deg to WeEu Russian DRM
1000-1200 on  5935 IRK 100 kW / 110 deg to EaAs English
1000-1200 on  7300 KHB 100 kW / 218 deg to EaAs Chinese
1000-1200 on 12035 IRK 015 kW / 224 deg to SoAs English DRM
1000-1200 on 15270 ARM 100 kW / 104 deg to WeAs English
1000-1400 on  5900 KHB 100 kW / 218 deg to EaAs Chinese
1000-1400 on  6075 KHB 100 kW / 218 deg to EaAs Chinese
1000-1400 on  6045 IRK 100 kW / 125 deg to EaAs Chinese
1000-1400 on  9450 KHB 100 kW / 218 deg to EaAs Chinese
1000-1400 on  9695 P.K 250 kW / 263 deg to EaAs Chinese
1000-1400 on  9865 P.K 250 kW / 263 deg to EaAs Chinese
1000-1400 on 11925 P.K 250 kW / 263 deg to EaAs Chinese
1100-1400 on  6195 S.P 200 kW / 217 deg to WeEu Russian
1100-1400 on 17830 MSK 250 kW / 100 deg to SEAs Russian
1200-1400 on  5935 IRK 100 kW / 110 deg to EaAs Japanese
1200-1400 on  7300 KHB 100 kW / 218 deg to EaAs Russian
1200-1400 on  7340 P.K 250 kW / 241 deg to EaAs Japanese
1200-1400 on 15270 ARM 100 kW / 104 deg to WeAs Russian
1200-1600 on 15495 MSK 250 kW / 117 deg to CeAs Russian
1300-1400 on  7320 IRK 015 kW / 224 deg to SoAs Hindi DRM
1300-1400 on 15660 ARM 500 kW / 110 deg to SoAs Russian
1300-1600 on  6175 ARM 100 kW / 188 deg to N/ME Turkish
1400-1500 on  5935 IRK 100 kW / 110 deg to EaAs English
1400-1500 on  7320 IRK 015 kW / 224 deg to SoAs Urdu DRM
1400-1500 on  7435 MSK 200 kW / 190 deg to N/ME Turkish
1400-1500 on 15660 ARM 500 kW / 110 deg to SoAs Urdu
1400-1600 on  6145 MSK 200 kW / 190 deg to CeAs Russian
1400-1700 on  6035 IRK 100 kW / 263 deg to CeAs Russian
1400-1800 on  6010 MSK 200 kW / 270 deg to NoAf English
1400-1900 on  6015 MSK 200 kW / 190 deg to CeAs Russian
1400-2200 on  9450 MSK 250 kW / 275 deg to WeEu English
1500-1700 on  5975 S.P 200 kW / 147 deg to WeAs Farsi
1500-1700 on  7435 MSK 200 kW / 190 deg to WeAs Kurdish
1500-1700 on 11635 ARM 500 kW / 290 deg to WeEu German
1500-1800 on  9560 P.K 250 kW / 247 deg to SEAs English
1500-1800 on 15660 ARM 500 kW / 110 deg to SoAs Russian
1500-1900 on  6045 MSK 250 kW / 240 deg to WeEu Russian
1500-1900 on  6140 MSK 040 kW / 261 deg to WeEu German DRM
1500-2000 on  6070 ARM 100 kW / 157 deg to N/ME Russian
1500-2200 on 12070 MSK 250 kW / 285 deg to WeEu English
1600-1700 on  6175 ARM 100 kW / 188 deg to WeAs Kurdish
1600-1800 on  5960 KLG 015 kW / 220 deg to WeEu Russian DRM
1600-1900 on  6110 IRK 250 kW / 240 deg to CeAs Russian
1600-1900 on 12035 MSK 040 kW / 261 deg to WeEu German DRM
1600-2100 on  6120 IRK 250 kW / 290 deg to N/ME Arabic
1600-2100 on  6195 S.P 200 kW / 217 deg to NoAf Arabic
1700-1900 on  7435 MSK 200 kW / 190 deg to N/ME Turkish
1700-1900 on  9800 MSK 250 kW / 117 deg to CeAs Russian
1700-1900 on  9820 MSK 200 kW / 270 deg to WeEu English
1700-2000 on 11635 ARM 500 kW / 290 deg to WeEu French
1700-2000 on  5975 S.P 200 kW / 147 deg to N/ME Arabic
1800-2000 on  5960 KLG 015 kW / 220 deg to WeEu French DRM
1800-2100 on  6010 MSK 200 kW / 270 deg to NoAf French
1800-2100 on  9900 IRK 015 kW / 224 deg to SoAs English DRM
1900-2100 on  9820 MSK 200 kW / 270 deg to WeEu Russian
2000-2130 on  6045 MSK 250 kW / 240 deg to WeEu Russian
2000-2200 on  9780 MSK 040 kW / 261 deg to WeEu Russian DRM
2100-2400 on 11655 KHB 100 kW / 218 deg to EaAs English
2200-2400 on  7240 MSK 500 kW / 267 deg to SoAm Spanish
2200-2400 on 12060 ARM 500 kW / 290 deg to CeAm Portuguese
2200-2400 on 17770 P.K 250 kW / 247 deg to SEAs English
2300-2400 on 11965 IRK 250 kW / 224 deg to SoAs English

Radio Rossii
0000-1500 on  7230 IAK 100 kW / 000 deg to FERu Russian
0700-1500 on 13820 MSK 250 kW / 267 deg to WeEu Russian
1900-2400 on  7230 IAK 100 kW / 000 deg to FERu Russian

United States
Updated summer A-14 schedule of WINB from August 17:
1130-1300 on  9265 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm English Sun
1300-1400 on 13570 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm English Sun
1400-1600 on 13570 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm English Sat/Sun
1600-1745 on  9265 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm English Sat/Sun
1715-1745 on  9265 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm English Tue
1745-2045 on  9265 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm English Daily
2045-2100 on  9265 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm Eng/Spa Mon-Fri
2045-2100 on  9265 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm English Sat/Sun
2100-2230 on  9265 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm English Daily
2230-2300 on  9265 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm Spanish Mon
2230-2300 on  9265 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm English Tue-Sun
2300-2400 on  9265 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm English Daily
0000-0100 on  9265 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm English Daily
0100-0130 on  9265 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm English Sun-Fri
0130-0230 on  9265 INB 050 kW / 242 deg to CeAm English Sat-Thu

United States (non)   Frequency changes of IBB effective from Sept.14:
Radio Liberty*
0300-0700 NF  6105 LAM 100 kW / 055 deg to EaEu Russian, ex 9635. And co-channel
0400-0500 on  6105 LAM 100 kW / 055 deg to EaEu Belarussian service of R.Liberty
*Voice of America*
0500-0600 on 11995 SMG 250 kW / 114 deg to WeAs Kurdish till Sept.14
0500-0600 on 15560 IRA 250 kW / 310 deg to WeAs Kurdish till Sept.14
0500-0600 on 17870 BIB 100 kW / 085 deg to WeAs Kurdish till Sept.14
1700-1800 NF  7215 BIB 100 kW / 105 deg to WeAs Kurdish, ex 7365
1900-1930 NF  9590 SAO 100 kW / 052 deg to SDN  Arabic Afia Darfur, ex 9600
1900-2000 on  6170 BIB 100 kW / 105 deg to WeAs Kurdish from Sept.15
1900-2000 on  7215 LAM 100 kW / 108 deg to WeAs Kurdish from Sept.15
1900-2000 on  9470 LAM 100 kW / 105 deg to WeAs Kurdish from Sept.15
1900-2100 NF  7470 PHT 250 kW / 021 deg to EaAs Korean, ex 5915, re-ex 5900
*Radio Free Asia from July 11*
2200-2300 NF 15260 TIN 250 kW / 280 deg to EaAs Cantonese Mon, ex 15120
2200-2300 NF 15270 TIN 250 kW / 280 deg to EaAs Cantonese Tue, ex 15120
2200-2300 NF 15280 TIN 250 kW / 280 deg to EaAs Cantonese Wed, ex 15120
2200-2300 NF 15290 TIN 250 kW / 280 deg to EaAs Cantonese Thu, ex 15120
2200-2300 NF 15300 TIN 250 kW / 280 deg to EaAs Cantonese Fri, ex 15120
2200-2300 NF 15380 TIN 250 kW / 280 deg to EaAs Cantonese Sat, ex 15120
2200-2300 NF 15390 TIN 250 kW / 280 deg to EaAs Cantonese Sun, ex 15120
(HCDX/Ivanov/11 Sept 2014)

United States
Updated schedule of WBCQ The Planet effective from Sept.7:
0000-0100 on  7490vBCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English Sat
0000-0100 on  5110vBCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English CUSB Sat
0000-0100 on  9330 BCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English CUSB Sat
0000-0300 on  7490vBCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English Mon-Sat Brother Stair till Sept.30
0000-0400 on  5110vBCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English CUSB Sun/Mon
0300-0400 on  7490vBCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English Daily
1400-1700 on 15420 BCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English CUSB Sat Brother Stair till Sept.27
1700-2100 on 15420 BCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English CUSB Daily
1900-2000 on  7490vBCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English Tue
2000-2100 on  7490vBCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English Mon-Fri
2100-2130 on  7490vBCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English Sun/Mon/Fri
2100-2130 on  7490vBCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm Spanish Tue-Thu
2130-2300 on  7490vBCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English Sun-Fri
2200-2300 on  9330 BCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English CUSB Mon-Fri
2300-2400 on  5110vBCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English CUSB Sat/Sun
2300-2400 on  7490vBCQ 050 kW / 245 deg to ENAm English Daily
5110v=5109.8
7490v=7489.9
(SWL DXing/12 Sept 2014)

********************************
Legend
Days:
m (Monday)
t (Tuesday)
w (Wednesday)
h (Thursday)
f (Friday)
a/Sat (Saturday)
s/Sun (Sunday)
DRM: Digital Radio Mondiale
NF new frequency

Target Areas:
af Africa
as  Asia
ca Central America
eu Europe
na North America
pa Pacific
sa South America
va Various target areas
(BCDX/DX Bulgaria/DX Window/WRTH/WWDXC-Top Nx/SWL-DXing/DX Mix Nx/HCDX/playdx)

VOA Radiogram weekend schedule


Hello friends,

As we approach autumn in the northern hemisphere, shortwave propagation is changing. The 17860 and 15670 kHz transmissions may become more difficult to hear in Europe. On the other hand, last weekend, Chris in New Zealand received the 15670 kHz transmission with a 100% decode (including the Russian).

Here is the lineup for VOA Radiogram, program 76, 13-14 September 2014, all MFSK32 except for surprise modes at the end of the show:

.1:35  Program preview
 2:33  "Internet slowdown" campaign, with image
10:19  Ozone layer may be recovering, with image
17:26  New VOA Russian TV program, with image
26:09  Closing announcements

Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com

VOA Radiogram transmission schedule
(all days and times UTC):
Sat 0930-1000 5745 kHz
Sat 1600-1630 17860 kHz
Sun 0230-0300 5745 kHz
Sun 1930-2000 15670 kHz
All via the Edward R. Murrow transmitting station in North Carolina.

The Radio Free Asia Cantonese Service continues its transmissions of Olivia 32-2000 this weekend and Monday, as follows:

​UTC Dates ​1458-1500 UTC ​2258-2300 UTC
​Saturday, 13 Sept ​13635 kHz ​15380 kHz
​Sunday, 14 Sept ​13700 ​15390
​Monday, 15 Sept ​13585 ​15260

The Olivia 32-2000 is centered on 1500 Hz. Each transmission is about a minute and a half. All frequencies are via Tinian. Send reports for these transmissions to qsl@rfa.org -- include your postal address, because they send paper QSLs.

The Mighty KBC will transmit its usual minute of MFSK64 Saturday at about 1130 UTC on 6095 kHz and Sunday at about 0130 UTC (Saturday 9:30 pm EDT) on 7375 kHz. Both frequencies are via Germany. Reports to themightykbc@gmail.com.

Thanks for your reports to VOA Radiogram last weekend, to which I will respond this weekend.

I hope you can tune in this weekend.

Kim

Kim Andrew Elliott
Producer and Presenter
VOA Radiogram

voaradiogram.net

Thursday, September 11, 2014

RFA 'text via tones' transmissions



Dear friends,

RFA is working with IBB testing transmissions of 'text via tones' over the next few days during both of RFA's Cantonese broadcast. The tests are running specifically at 1458-1500 and 2258-2300 UTC. The last test broadcast will be Monday, September 15, at 2258 UTC. 

As you can see from the attached JPG, we have designed a special QSL card for these tests know many will submit reception reports and want the reception confirmed. 
Here are the frequencies where you will find the test broadcasts between now and Monday, September 15. 

1458-1500 UTC
Fri 13585
Sat 13635
Sun 13700
Mon 13585

2258-2300 UTC
Thu 15290
Fri 15300
Sat 15380
Sun 15390
Mon 15260

For information on decoding the tones, please visit http://voaradiogram.net
Hope this gives you another reason to turn on your radios. 

73.  AJ

-- 
Andrew "A.J." Janitschek
Radio Free Asia

Never Forget 9 11


Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Another Blast From the Past - American Medium Wave



American Medium Wave Radio on High Power

On two previous occasions here in Wavescan we have presented the story of high powered broadcasting; on longwave throughout the world, and on medium wave throughout the world except for North America.  On this occasion we present the story of high powered radio broadcasting on medium wave in the United States, Mexico and Canada under the title Another Blast from the Past American Medium wave Radio on High Power.

            As in other parts of the world, when medium wave radio broadcasting made its first tenuous attempts in the United States, the transmitter power was quite low, some times as low as 5 or 10 watts, with 500 watts considered to be in the top bracket.  The first station in the United States at 5 kW was Powell Crosleys famous WLW in Cincinnati Ohio which was inaugurated in January 1925 on 710 kHz at a new location in Harrison Ohio.

Even though WLW became quite famous in the American power race, yet it was not the first station to operate at a higher power level.  Towards the end of the year 1925, Westinghouse opened a new facility at Bound Brook for their medium wave station WJZ which was licensed at the time to Newark New Jersey. 
            This new WJZ transmitter was rated at 50 kW (on 660 kHz) and it is listed as the first station in the United States at this power level.  However, the strong signal from the new WJZ overwhelmed everything else on the air and so this higher power was in use only spasmodically for the first ten years.
            Three years after the inauguration of WJZ at a spasmodic 50 kW, the Cincinnati WLW inaugurated its 50 kW unit at a new location in Mason Ohio, somewhat north of Cincinnati itself.  This was the first medium wave station with regular operation at 50 kW in the United States, and several other stations followed in quick succession.
            The first super power station in the United States was not WLW, and not even KDKA, but rather WGY at South Schenectady in New York State. 
     
            According to Radio Broadcast magazine for October 1927, station WGY was permitted to conduct test broadcasts at 100 kW from midnight until 1:00 am under the callsign W2XAG.  These high powered test transmissions began on August 4, 1926, and a photo of the transmitter is shown on page 340 of this particular issue of Radio Broadcast magazine.  At an increased power of 200 kW, W2XAG began another series of test transmissions on March 9, 1930.
            Then came the well known KDKA at Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania.  In the early part of the year 1932, the famous KDKA began experimental transmissions at 400 kW from its location at Saxonburg under the callsign W8XAR.  These experimental broadcasts were permitted on air only between 1:00 am and 6:00 am.

Nearly two years later, WLW began test transmissions from its new 500 kW transmitter under the callsign W8XO.  This massive transmitter was assembled under contract by RCA at their Camden factory in New Jersey. 
            Both GE and Westinghouse participated as sub-contractors for the Ohio project by providing basic segments for the total transmitter assembly which was made up of a 50 kW transmitter acting as the driver followed by three successive power amplifiers.  The entire transmitter was installed against the back wall of a second building at Mason Ohio, adjacent to the regular transmitter for mediumwave WLW.  The entire facility, transmitter and antenna system, cost $½ million and it was inaugurated on May 2, 1934 during a ceremony at the White House with President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
            However, because of the massive power output from Mason Ohio, complaints flooded in from listeners in both Canada and the United States who complained of interference to programming from other stations on the same or nearby channels.  People living nearby to the massive transmitter complained that the programming could be heard from metal roofing, coil springs in mattresses and from other spots at the conjunction of two different metals.  In response, the power output from WLW-W8XO was reduced to just 50 kW during the hours of darkness. 
            During World War 2, the 500 kW W8XO was switched into service for occasional special broadcasts for American servicemen on duty in Europe.  The last time that W8XO was on the air with programming at full power was in 1943, though the transmitter was maintained for possible usage up into the 1960s.  Sometime afterwards, the transmitter was gutted leaving just the shell, and the antenna system was sold to an FM station in Eaton Ohio, station WCTM (WJAI-WGTZ) 92.9 MHz.     
            During the era running from the 1930s into the 1960s, somewhere around twenty medium wave stations in the United States applied to the FCC for approval to install super power transmitters and the requested power level varied from 400 kW to 750 kW.  However, none were approved and the maximum power level for medium wave in the United States (and Canada also) has remained at 50 kW. 
            The first high powered medium wave transmitters in Canada were 50 kW units that were installed for coverage of Toronto and Montreal in 1937.  The new CBL Toronto was built at nearby Hornby and it was allocated the channel 740 kHz; the new  CBF Montreal was built at nearby Contrecoeur and it was allocated the channel 910 kHz.
            Interestingly, Mexico also entered the power race back in the 1930s with a whole slew of stations in northern Mexico that were bent on capturing listeners across the border in the United States, a lucrative commercial market.  These border blasters as they were called, emitted power ranging from 50 kW, up to 100 kW and 250 kW, and even 500 kW.          
            Station XED in Reynosa was the first border blaster in Mexico at 10 kW in 1930.  This station later became XEAW.  It appears that the highest powered border blasters in Mexico have been XERA at Villa Acuna, and XEX & XEW in Mexico City, each at around 500 kW.
            The current WRTVHB lists just seven super power mediumwave stations in Mexico.  These are:-                        One station at 78 kW  XEWW                        Tijuana                                      690 kHz
                        Four at 100 kW           XEG                Monterrey                   1050
                                                            XEP                 Mexico City                 1060
                                                            XERED           Mexico City                 1110
                                                            XERF              Cuidad Acuna             1570
                        One at 150 kW            XEWA             San Luis Potosi             540
                        One at 250 kW            XEWW                        Mexico City                   900

In the United States itself, four super power stations have been constructed and taken into regular radio broadcasting service.  The first on air was WGY-W2XAG at South Schenectady in New York State with 100 kW in 1926 and 200 kW in 1930  The second superpower station was KDKA-W8XAR at Saxonburg in Pennsylvania with 400 kW on 980 kHz in 1932.  The third was WLW-W8XO in Mason Ohio with 500 kW on 700 kHz in 1934.
            The fourth American superpower station was WJZ in Bound Brook New Jersey with 500 kW on 770 kHz.  However, this WJZ super power transmitter was never activated at Bound Brook in the United States; instead it was exported to England for another purpose, and thats another story for another day here in Wavescan.  
(AWR-Wavescan/NWS 289) 

Monday, September 08, 2014

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletins



Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2014 Sep 08 0624 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/weekly.html
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#

Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 01 - 07 September 2014

Solar activity was at low to moderate levels during the period. Moderate levels were first observed with an M2/Sf flare at 03/1354 UTC from Region 2152 (S15, L=206, class/area Eki/310 on 04 September). An associated coronal mass ejection (CME) was observed in SOHO/LASCO C2 imagery at 03/1400 UTC but was determined to not contain an Earth-directed component. Moderate levels were again reached with an M1/Sf flare at 06/1709 UTC from Region 2157 (S14,L=98, class/area Ekc/540 on 06 September). The majority of the C-class flare activity during the rest of the period was primarily from Region 2152 and 2157. A 44 degree long filament, centered near 32W14, erupted between 02/1300-1600 UTC and did contain a geo effective component. WSA/ENLIL modeling of the event showed an arrival time early to midday on 06 September. 

The greater than 10 MeV proton flux at geosynchronous orbit was enhanced between 02 September and 07 September as a result of a far-sided event that occurred on 02 September, but remained below alert level thresholds throughout the period. A peak value 9.7 pfu
was reached at 06/0740 UTC. 

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit was at high levels on 01-05 September, moderate levels on 06 September, and returned to normal background levels. A peak value of 6,110 pfu was reached at 02/1620 UTC. 

The geomagnetic field was at quiet to unsettled levels during the period. Quiet to unsettled levels occurred from 01-04 September as a result of coronal high-speed stream influence that ranged between approximately 400-450 km/s. Quiet conditions returned on 05 September. Solar wind conditions were once again enhanced on 06 September due to a solar sector boundary crossing that was observed at 06/0434 UTC. Total field measurements increased from 5 nT to 11 nT while the Bz component went briefly south to -9 nT. The total field became further enhanced to 12 nT and the Bz component deflected southward to -7 nT for approximately nine hours after midday on 06 September as the 02 September CME began to influence the Earth's magnetic field. A sudden impulse of 63 nT was observed at the College magnetometer at 06/1525 UTC. The geomagnetic field responded with quiet to unsettled conditions for the remainder of the period. 

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 08 September - 04 October 2014

Solar activity is likely to be moderate (R1-R2/Minor-Moderate) with a chance for X-class flaring (R3-Strong or greater) until 16 Sep when Regions 2157 and 2158 (N16, L=88, class/area Dkc/380 on 07 September) depart the visible disk. For the rest of the period, Solar activity is expected to be low with a chance for M-class flares due to the return of old Regions 2146 (N07, L=344), 2149 (N09, L=284), and 2151 (S08, L=253) 

There is a chance for a greater than 10 MeV proton event from 08-17 Sep due to potential significant flare activity from Regions 2157 and 2158. 

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to be at high levels between 11-14 September and again on 27 September through 04 October due to coronal hole high-speed stream effects. 

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to reach quiet to unsettled levels on 08, 10-11, 13, and 28-30 September while unsettled to active levels are expected from 25-27 September due to recurrent coronal hole high-speed stream effects. 

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2014 Sep 08 0624 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/wwire.html
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2014-09-08
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2014 Sep 08     140          10          3
2014 Sep 09     145           5          2
2014 Sep 10     150           8          3
2014 Sep 11     150           8          3
2014 Sep 12     150           5          2
2014 Sep 13     150           8          3
2014 Sep 14     150           5          2
2014 Sep 15     155           5          2
2014 Sep 16     140           5          2
2014 Sep 17     145           5          2
2014 Sep 18     140           5          2
2014 Sep 19     145           5          2
2014 Sep 20     145           5          2
2014 Sep 21     150           5          2
2014 Sep 22     145           5          2
2014 Sep 23     135           5          2
2014 Sep 24     130           5          2
2014 Sep 25     130          18          4
2014 Sep 26     125          15          4
2014 Sep 27     125          15          4
2014 Sep 28     130          12          3
2014 Sep 29     145          12          3
2014 Sep 30     145          10          3
2014 Oct 01     150           5          2
2014 Oct 02     145           5          2
2014 Oct 03     140           5          2
2014 Oct 04     135           5          2
(NOAA)

Friday, September 05, 2014

VOA Radiogram Schedule

Hello friends,

Radio Free Asia will try digital text in its Cantonese Service on Friday, 5 September:


2258 UTC    15120 kHz  (Saturday early morning in East Asia)

Both frequencies are via Tinian, Northern Mariana Islands. The mode is Olivia 32-2000 centered on 1500 Hz. Expect co-channel Chinese domestic radio. Reception reports to qsl@rfa.org .

VOA Radiogram this weekend will include interesting (and longer than usual) stories, one about an Internet conference in Turkey, the other about a major Russian news agency reverting to the name TASS. There will also be a brief item in Russian, so set Configure > Colors & Fonts to the UTF-8 character set.

Here is the lineup for VOA Radiogram, program 75, 6-7 September 2014, all in MFSK32 centered on 1500 Hz except for two surprise modes at the end of the show:

 1:31  Program preview (now)
 2:26  Internet Governance Forum in Turkey, with image
11:02  Russia's renamed TASS news agency, with image
21:31  VOA Russian: paper microscope, with image
25:57  Closing announcements

Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com .

VOA Radiogram transmission schedule
(all days and times UTC):
Sat 0930-1000 5745 kHz
Sat 1600-1630 17860 kHz
Sun 0230-0300 5745 kHz
Sun 1930-2000 15670 kHz
All via the Edward R. Murrow transmitting station in North Carolina.

The Mighty KBC will repeat last weekend's one-minute test of the vertical blue line in MFSK64. This will be Saturday at about 1130 UTC on 6095 kHz and Sunday at about 0130 UTC (Saturday evening 9:30 pm EDT) on new 7375 kHz. Both frequencies are via  Germany. Reports to themightykbc@gmail.com.

Thank you for your reports to VOA Radiogram during the weekend of 30-31 August. I saw many successful displays of the Tibetan text. I will try to answer all your emails by the end of this weekend.

Kim

Kim Andrew Elliott
Producer and Presenter
VOA Radiogram
voaradiogram.net

Thursday, September 04, 2014

Update on RFA QSLing


Dear friends,

We are changing the way we send QSL card information by email for our friends and listeners; we believe this will improve our handling of QSL information and reception reports.  This week we will distribute the press release for our new QSL card design which will be used for all confirmed reception reports from Sep 1 - Dec 31. 

There may be some bumps as we start the new method but we hope you will be patient with us. 

As always, please let us know if you want to be removed from our email list.

Thank you for continued interest in RFA, our programming, and especially for your interest in our QSL cards.  

73.

AJ
-- 
Andrew "A.J." Janitschek
Director
Program & Operations Support
Radio Free Asia
2025 M. Street NW
Washington DC 20036
United States of America
+1 202 530 4999

Visit us at www.rfa.org or at http://techweb.rfa.org. 


Throwback Thursday: ORTB Bénin



ORTB Bénin QSL card (Gayle Van Horn collection)
Last reported in 2006, Office De Radiodiffusion Et Télévision Du Bénin, was on every DXers 'Hit List.' Broadcasting from Cotonou, Radio Bénin began broadcasting nightly in French from 0500 UTC on 4870 and 7210 kHz. Their sign-on was from a Bénin tam-tam instrument, followed by "Ici Bénin Office De Radiodiffusion Et Télévision Du Bénin, émettant de Cotonou.” With favorable conditions, you might catch them before their 2300 UTC sign-off in early evening. Programming was targeted to a domestic audience with local flare of topics and indigenous music.

A great addition to anyone's QSL collection

The Radio Story on the Isle of Wight

The white cliffs on the Isle of Wight
From the Needles to Colombo: The Radio Story on the Isle of Wight 
            The Isle of Wight is located on the southern edge of England half a dozen miles across the waterway known as the Solent.  The island itself is approximately 25 miles by 12 miles, and it might be described as a diamond shaped diagonal square.  Tourism is the islands main industry, and dinosaur fossils are found in the chalk cliffs.  The resident population is around 140,000.
            The island is rich in European and British history, and it was known as Vectis under the rule of the Roman Empire two thousand years ago.  At one stage it was an independent kingdom during the era of the 1400s. 
            The most famous building on the Isle of Wight is Osborne House, built under the direction of the illustrious Queen Victoria in the mid 1800s.  At the time when Melbourne was the temporary capital city of Australia, before the federal development of Canberra, Government House was designed and built as a copy of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight.
            It was in November 1897 that the famous Italian wireless inventor, Guglielmo Marconi, made a visit to the Isle of Wight and he rented rooms in the Royal Needles Hotel overlooking Alum Bay on the western tip for the winter.  The Needles were a neat row of four rocky pinnacles extending out into the edge of the bay, though the slender most has long since collapsed.
            Marconi installed his wireless equipment in the Billiard Room, and a 168 foot tall wooden mast was erected in the grounds nearby.  Work on the installation of the wireless station was completed by Marconis assistant George Kemp on December 5 (1897), and next day, Monday December 6, test transmissions were commenced.
            On the Tuesday, test transmissions began with two tug boats belonging to the South Western Railway Company.  These two tugs, the Solent and the Mayflower, received the Morse Code tests from the new Marconi wireless station in the Royal Needles Hotel while they were stationary in Alum Bay, and while maneuvering around the Solent waterway. 
            On January 9 of the New Year 1898, Marconi gave a successful public demonstration of his wireless equipment.  Then, on July 3, the station was opened for commercial Morse Code messages back to the English mainland.
            In March 1899, the Marconi company shipped a load of wireless equipment on a motor launch to the nearby French coast, where it was installed on the ocean front at Wimereux.  On the 27th, the worlds first international wireless messages were exchanged between the two Marconi stations, Wimereux in France and the Needles on the Isle of Wight in England.  This first message ended with three Vs in Morse Code  _  signifying victory, success. 
            On June 3, Lord Kelvin sent the worlds first paid wireless telegram from the new Marconi station at Needles on the Isle of Wight.  This message, which was addressed to Sir George Stokes and Sir William Preece, simply stated the route by which it traveled, from the Isle of Wight by wireless to nearby Bournemouth on the English mainland, and thence by wire to Cambridge & Glasgow.  Lord Kelvin paid one shilling for this historic exercise.
            During a 16 day period in August of this same year 1898, 150 messages were successfully transmitted between the Royal Yacht Osborne and Osborne House on the Isle of Wight.  Osborne House was the private home of the elderly Queen Victoria and her 9 children; and during this time period the Royal Yacht Osborne was afloat in the Solent, the waterway that separates the Isle of Wight from the English mainland.
            During a visit to Paris, the eldest son and heir apparent to the royal throne, Prince Albert Edward, fell and hurt his knee.  He chose to spend his time of convalescence aboard the Royal Yacht Osborne, and Queen Victoria invited Marconi to install wireless equipment at both locations for communication between the royal mother and her son. 
            The landbased terminal was installed in Ladywood Cottage in the spacious grounds of the grand Osborne palace.  As a gesture of appreciation, the 79 year old queen invited the 24 year old Marconi to lunch at Osborne House.
            On November 15, 1899, Marconi was aboard the ship SS St. Paul, some 36 miles near to the Isle of Wight on his return voyage from a visit to North America.  A bulletin of news was transmitted in Morse Code from the Royal Needles Hotel and received on the St. Paul where it was printed out for the passengers as the worlds first wireless newspaper at sea, the Transatlantic Times.
            However, the hotel owner increased the rent during the next year 1900 by £1 per week and so Marconi dismantled the station in June and re-erected it with additional new equipment on Knowles Farm at Niton on the bottom tip of the island.  The final message from the Royal Needles at Alum Bay was on May 26.
            Test transmissions from the new Niton station began on January 22, 1901; and next day a new distance record was established with reception at the Lizard in Cornwall, a distance of 196 miles.  Eight years later, the Niton station was taken over by the British Post Office.
            A new Marconi station was constructed nearby at Lower Niton.  As time went by, this station was granted the callsign GNI and it operated as Niton Radio for marine communication.  During World War 2, Niton Radio was bombed by the German Air Force, with some superficial damage nearby.  Niton Radio was finally closed on May 31, 1997. 
            During the war, several additional temporary stations were installed on the Isle of Wight, including radar stations and a mobile communication facility that was placed on the air near Chichester  immediately before D-Day, the massive invasion of continental Europe which began on June 6, 1944.
            Towards the end of the year 1944, an aerial system, probably a multi-wire rhombic, and some of the temporary electronic equipment on the Isle of Wight was disassembled and shipped to Colombo Sri Lanka, or Ceylon as it was back then, for installation at the new SEAC broadcasting station at Ekala,  However, the ship was torpedoed and sunk off the coast of Ceylon and the radio equipment was lost.  A second shipment was soon afterwards sent out from England and this was installed at the historic SEAC station at Ekala.

            The first, and only, medium wave broadcasting station, Isle of Wight Radio, was inaugurated on April 15, 1990 with a 500 watt transmitter at Briddlesford Farm on 1242 kHz.  This station transferred to the FM band in March 1998, and the medium wave unit was closed down soon afterwards.
(AWR-Wavescan/NWS 287)

AWR Contest : Focus on Asia 2014 Annual DX Contest


Rare, Unusual, Unique QSLs: AWR Focus on Asia 2014 Annual DX Contest - 10:26
            The time has come!  Beginning on Monday (September 1) it is Contest month for AWR Wavescan.
            As Adventist World Radio enters into its 43rd year of international radio broadcasting, we take pleasure in announcing our annual Wavescan DX contest, which comes to you under the title, Rare, Unusual, Unique QSLs.  In short, you are invited to check your collection of QSL cards and letters for rare, unusual and unique QSLs from shortwave, mediumwave and communication stations throughout the world.  You are also invited to log AWR programming to Asia on shortwave, mediumwave or FM during the month of September 2014. 
            Here are the details of our 2014 Rare, Unusual, Unique QSLs: AWR Focus on Asia Annual DX Contest:-

A. Rare, Unique and Unusual QSL Cards and Letters
* You are invited to make a list of what you consider to be your rare, unique or unusual QSL cards or                  letters in your QSL collection.  Perhaps no one else in the world has a QSL verifying some                       transmissions that you have verified.
* Your list of QSLs can show any number of different rare, unique or unusual QSLs up to a total of 5                   QSLs.
* Your QSLs may verify a wrong transmission channel or an emergency broadcast due to flood, fire,                  earthquake, turmoil etc, or a transmission from an emergency transmitter, or test broadcasts, or              first broadcast or last broadcast, unusual propagation, etc. 
 * These QSLs can be from any shortwave broadcasting station or shortwave communication station or              mediumwave station located in any country anywhere in the world.  Amateur QSLs nor CB                      QSLs are not valid for this contest. 
* You are invited to provide a photocopy of each of the QSLs that are on your list in Part A.  Preferably,             these photocopies should be in color, though black & white copies may be acceptable.

B. Details of Rare, Unique and Unusual QSL Cards and Letters
* Please state very briefly, no more than one paragraph for each, why you consider each item in your                 list of QSLs is rare, unique or unusual.

C. AWR Reception Reports
* You are invited to prepare three reception reports for the broadcast on shortwave mediumwave or FM             of any AWR Asian programming.  These broadcasts from Adventist World Radio may be from                    shortwave, mediumwave or FM stations located anywhere in Asia or on nearby Asian islands; or        AWR programming beamed into Asia on shortwave         from other countries.
* It is not necessary to send an off-air recording of your reception.  We just need your honest reception               report on paper.

D. Adventist Photograph
* You are invited to visit a unit of the Seventh-day Adventist denomination in your country and take a                  photograph of it, preferably in color, though B&W can be acceptable, and submit one picture                    with your contest entry.

E. Three Radio Cards
* Where possible, you are invited to include three radio cards for the Indianapolis Heritage Collection                   with your contest entry.  These cards may be old or new, and they may be QSL cards, reception                    report cards, or picture cards of radio stations, etc.  Not valid for this contest are amateur cards              nor CB cards.

Other Contest Details
* Well, there you have it, the details for our Wavescan 2014 Rare, Unusual, Unique QSLs: AWR           Focus on Asia Annual DX Contest.
* This contest will run through the month of September 2014, and all contest entries should be                              postmarked at your local post office anywhere in the world on any date up to the end of the                     month of September and they should be received at the AWR post office address in                                 Indianapolis no later than the end of the month of October 2014.
* Partial and incomplete entries are considered valid.
* Post your entry with all items to Adventist World Radio in Indianapolis, remembering that neatness                    and preparation, will all feature in the judging procedure.  Due consideration will also be given to          the area of the world in which the contestant lives.
* Where possible, please enclose return postage in the form of currency notes in any international                       currency, or mint postage stamps.  Please note that IRC coupons are too expensive for you to                buy, and they are no longer valid in the United States. 
* Please enclose your postal address label also.
* The awards for the 2014 AWR Rare, Unusual, Unique QSLs  -  AWR Focus on Asia Annual             DX                   Contest will be similar to all previous contests.  There will be a special award for the world                        winner, one of the Jerome Berg radio history books; and World Radio TV Handbook 2015 for                  each continental winner.  In addition, there will be other special awards as well as AWR                            souvenirs and radio curios for many participants. 
*  You can remember that all AWR reception reports will be verified with a specially endorsed AWR QSL             card.  Please remember that it will take a period of many months, well into the new year 2015,                 to process all of the contest entries and reception reports, but each will in due course be                               processed. 
* The only address for the Rare, Unusual, Unique QSLs: AWR Focus on Asia Annual DX Contest is:-
                        QSL DX Contest
                        Adventist World Radio
                        Box 29235
                        Indianapolis

                        Indiana 46229 USA